Corey Lake Orchards: One-Source Farmers Market

The farm is quiet on the late February day we visit. Equipment and supplies are stored for the winter, glistening snow blankets the fields and ice fishermen are on the lake across the road. But farm work never stops. Winter is when grapevines are pruned, tractors are maintained and Beth Hubbard, owner of Corey Lake Orchards, grows tomato plants in the greenhouse.

Corey Lake Orchard in winterBeth Hubbard“Seventy-five days right now to our first BLT. About May 15 is when we’ll be getting tomatoes out of here,” comments Beth. “Our own lettuce, our own tomatoes and pork from down the road. That’s when our asparagus comes in.” The season begins with asparagus and greenhouse tomatoes and ends with pumpkins, apples, grapes and root vegetables. And all summer long more varieties of produce than can easily be counted fill the market. “So we’re like a farmers market, but we do it all,” says Beth. An on-site bakery that bakes pies from scratch using the farm’s fruit and a distillery also made from the farm’s fruit are added bonuses.

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In early August we pay another visit to Corey Lake Orchards. This time business is in full swing. The sweet aroma of cantaloupe greets us as we browse the market’s bins of freshly picked peaches, blueberries, green beans and more than a dozen other fruits and vegetables. Pies go out the bakery door often still warm from the oven, and Becca, Beth’s niece, is manning the brandy tasting table.

Corey Lake Orchards marketBeth, who took over the reins of the family farm when her parents passed on, takes us on a tour of the farm. Blueberries, available for u-pick, as are several other several other items, are nearing the end of the season. The variety that remains is small but sweet, and there are still enough for people to pick.

blueberriesWe move on to the plum trees, brimming with fruit. “It’s not normal. What’s interesting is these are fairly young trees, and this is the first year they’ve really produced. I’m really pleased with them,” says Beth. They look ripe, but Beth says it’s deceiving. They aren’t quite ripe but will be ready soon. The plums aren’t usually available for u-pick, but since they’re so plentiful, Beth is considering it this year.

plumsAnd on we go with peaches, apples—25 varieties of them—and concord grapes. Corey Lake Orchards has the only u-pick grapes available in the area, and people travel from at least three states to pick them to make jelly or juice.

peachesapplesgrapesWe check out some of the vegetables ready or near-ready for harvest—zucchini, peppers and green beans among them. Tomatoes should be ready in a couple of weeks. Beth tells us that many local folks don’t bother to grow their own tomatoes anymore. Instead they come to the farm and pick a bushel or two for canning, saving the time and trouble of growing their own.

farm produceOnions, 45,000 sets of them planted this year, are beginning to harvest. Once harvested, they’re hung in the market and in the “onion barn” to dry and cure for about two weeks before they’re put into mesh bags for sale. Drying them extends the life to about four months.

onionsA few years ago the bakery was added to the market. Beth’s daughter-in-law Michaela and Michaela’s mom Patty are the two full-time bakers, another works part-time and others are pulled in as needed. “Over a really busy weekend like the 4th of July, it’s nothing to go through a thousand pies in the weekend,” Michaela tells me. And it’s all done by hand in small batches, with oil-based dough that results in flaky, shortbread-like crust.

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The types of pie rotate by the season, starting with strawberry-rhubarb, one of their biggest sellers. They freeze in-season fruit to keep popular pies like blueberry and cherry available all season. Come fall, they bake pecan pie and pumpkin pie with fresh pumpkins that they roast themselves. Michaela tells us there are people who drive up from Georgia to buy their pecan pies, ten or fifteen of them at a time. “What makes your pecan pie special?” I ask. “Love, a whole lot of love,” replies Michaela. “It’s an old family recipe we use. We never change recipes. But the crust usually is what really sets our pies off.”

Corey lake orchards bakerySpirits are another product produced on the farm. We’re visiting on a Saturday afternoon, so we take advantage of the tasting table. Skip has made his way there first and tells me I must try the Cherries Jubilee hard cider. The tart cherry flavor really comes through. Becca tells us the cherries are added at the end of the fermentation so the cherry flavor doesn’t ferment out.

brandy tasting at Corey Lake OrchardsWe also sample an 80 percent alcohol-by-volume pear brandy, straight up, and it’s warm going down. But then, I usually drink hard liquor only in mixed drinks. Becca pours me a sample of rosemary lemonade made with apple brandy. The apple brandy, by far their most popular beverage, is aged for two years in whiskey barrels. Becca made the lemonade the night before, letting rosemary and sage sprigs flavor the light, refreshing beverage.

Besides the distillery, Becca also tends a u-pick herb garden. For a dollar a bag, customers can hand pick herbs. She has also started a natural garden. It isn’t certified organic, but she uses only natural methods to grow vegetables in her plot.

herb gardenAlong with produce, you can also buy fresh flowers from Corey Lake Orchards either pre-cut or cut them yourself from the four-tier garden.

flowersAs busy as they are on our August visit, the busiest season for Corey Lake Orchards is the fall. Apple and grape picking is in full swing then. The pumpkin patch is dotted with orange pumpkins and specialty varieties like white Cinderella pumpkins. You can see fresh apple cider being pressed on hundred-year-old equipment and sample some for yourself. The bakery sells popular apple cider donuts and pumpkin donuts. 2015 will be the first year for a corn maze, too, making Corey Lake Orchards a complete fall destination adventure.

Corey Lake Orchards, located at 12147 Corey Lake Road in Three Rivers, Michigan, is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. in season. Check the web site for regular blog updates as to what is available to buy, as well as u-pick options.

Disclosure: Our February visit to Corey Lake Orchards was hosted by the River Country Tourism Council of Greater St. Joseph County. However, all opinions in this article are my own.

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20 thoughts on “Corey Lake Orchards: One-Source Farmers Market

  • August 13, 2015 at 12:07 pm
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    You should do a grass fed beef farm

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    • August 13, 2015 at 1:41 pm
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      I am definitely open to that, Larry.

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    • August 15, 2015 at 6:38 pm
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      Thanks, Paula. I love markets in general, but Corey Lake Orchards has more diversity than any I’ve seen.

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    • August 15, 2015 at 6:40 pm
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      We’ve already devoured a fresh peach pie. I understand why people rave about their crusts. It’s the best I’ve ever tasted.

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  • August 15, 2015 at 10:11 am
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    Oooh I love seeing all of those fresh fruits growing! U-pick is the best! I want to eat those blueberries yum!!! Thanks for linking up with #WeekendWanderlust!

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    • August 15, 2015 at 6:41 pm
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      We used to pick blueberries every year and freeze enough to last the entire year. We need to get back to doing that.

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  • August 17, 2015 at 8:05 am
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    Such a wonderful concept! Sometimes the simple ways of life are the best. Actually, make that all the time. 🙂

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    • August 21, 2015 at 11:04 am
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      Corey Lake Orchards is definitely a really nice family-run operation, but I could tell it’s hard, hard work. The original owner was a horticulturist. His daughter Beth, who now runs it is not a horticulturist, and she had to learn a lot about a lot of different crops. Not so simple, but I’m sure rewarding.

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  • August 17, 2015 at 8:49 pm
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    What a cute place! I love orchards, they are so charming and picturesque. Especially when they are small(ish) family run places they’re awesome.

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    • August 21, 2015 at 11:05 am
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      They’ve got an awesome view of the lake across the road, definitely picturesque.

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  • August 19, 2015 at 1:52 pm
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    I love farm visits, such a natural experience, and hey there’s food involved so must be good. I’d love to try some of those pies, never had anything like that before, looks delicious.

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    • August 21, 2015 at 11:16 am
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      We’ve already eaten a peach pie. Delicious! We put the blueberry pie, my favorite, in the freezer, but I think we’ll break into it this weekend.

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  • August 23, 2015 at 5:27 am
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    Ooh, I fall in love with this place a bit! So much good looking fresh fruits and veggies 😀 And some great products being made from them 🙂 Love it!

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    • August 27, 2015 at 8:26 pm
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      Definitely lots of good stuff at Corey Lake Orchards. I’m hoping to squeeze in another trip there this fall to see them make the fresh apple cider, pick some apples and maybe some grapes.

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    • August 27, 2015 at 8:27 pm
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      Definitely lots of good stuff there.

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    • September 3, 2015 at 7:37 pm
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      I still have the blueberry pie in the freezer. Thinking about it now I’m tempted to take it out, thaw it and have a piece for dessert.

      Reply

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